Monday, October 17, 2005

TODAY IN JUDAISM: Tuesday, October 18, 2005


Due to holiday observance, the Yom Tov edition of Today in Judaism is sent on Monday. Chag Sameach!

Tishrei 15, 5766 * October 18, 2005


* Laws * Customs * Jewish History * Daily Quote * Daily Study *

Today is: Tuesday, Tishrei 15, 5766
Sukkot - 1st day

Today's Laws & Customs

• Eat in Sukkah (7 days)

The festival of Sukkot, commemorating G-d's enveloping protection of the Children of Israel during their 40-year journey through the desert (1313-1273 BCE), is celebrated for seven days, beginning from the eve of Tishrei 15. During this time, we are commanded to "dwell" in a sukkah -- a hut of temporary construction, with a roof covering of raw, unfinished vegetable matter (branches, reeds, bamboo, etc.) -- signifying the temporality and fragily of human habitation and man-made shelter and our utter dependence upon G-d's protection and providence. "How [does one fulfill] the mitzvah of dwelling in the sukkah? One should eat, drink, and live in the sukkah, both day and night, as one lives in one's house on the other days of the year: for seven days a person should make his home his temporary dwelling, and his sukkah his permanent dwelling" (Code of Jewish Law, Orach Chaim 639:1).

At least one k'zayit (approx. 1 oz.) of bread should be eaten in the sukkah on the first evening of the festival, between nightfall and midnight. A special blessing, Leishiv BaSukkah, is recited. For the rest of the festival, all meals must be eaten in the sukkah (see the Code of Jewish Law or consult a Halachic authority as to what constitutes a "meal"). Chabad custom is to refrain from eating or drinking anything outside of the sukkah, even a glass of water.

Also see: the Ushpizin []

Links: The Big Sukkah []; The Temporary Dwelling []; The Easy Mitzvah []

• The Ushpizin

According to Kabbalistic tradition, we are visited in the sukkah by seven supernal ushpizin ("guests") -- Abraham [], Isaac [], Jacob [], Moses [], Aaron [], Joseph [] and David []. On each of the seven days of the festival, another of the seven ushpizin (in the above order) leads the group.

(The sixth Lubavitcher Rebbe, Rabbi Yosef Yitzchak Schneersohn (1880-1950) spoke of seven "chassidic ushpizin" as well: the Baal Shem Tov [], the Maggid [] (Rabbi DovBer of Mezeritch), and the first five rebbes of Chabad: Rabbi Schneur Zalman [] of Liadi, Rabbi DovBer [] of Lubavitch, Rabbi Menachem Mendel [] (the "Tzemach Tzeddek"), Rabbi Shmuel [], and Rabbi Sholom DovBer. The Lubavitcher Rebbe would speak each night of Sukkot on the special characteristics of both the biblical and the chassidic ushpizin of the day and their connection to each other and their specific day of the festival.)

Link: The Unpopular Tzaddik []

• The "Four Kinds" (6 days)

"And you shall take for yourself on the first day," instructs the Torah in Leviticus "the splendid fruit of a tree, fronds of dates, the branch of the thick-leafed tree and aravot of the river." Torah SheBaal Peh (the oral tradition given to Moses at Sinai and handed threough the generations, and later documented in the Mishnah and Talmud) identifies the four kinds as the etrog (citron), lulav (unopened palm branch), hadass (myrtle twig, of which three are taken) and aravah (willow, two twigs). The palm branch, three myrtle twigs and two willow twigs are bound together (with rings made from palm leaves).

Each day of Sukkot -- except Shabbat -- we take the lulav in hand, recite a blessing over it, take hold of the trog, hold the "Four Kinds" together, and move them back and forth in all directions (right, left, forward, up, down and back). An additional blessing, shehecheyanu, is recited the first time that the Four Kinds are taken during the festival. We also hold the Four Kinds during the Hallel prayer (moving them as above in specified places in the text) and the Hoshaanot prayers (duriung which we march around the reading table in the synagogue) which are included in the daily service each day of Sukkot.

Link: The Four Mysteries of King Solomon []

• "Water Drawing" Celebrations (7 nights)

When the Holy Temple stood in Jerusalem, one of the special Sukkot observances was to pour water on the Altar. The drawing of water for this purpose was preceded by all-night celebrations in the Temple courtyard; on the 15 steps leading to the azarah (inner courtyard) stood Levites with playing a variety of musical instruments, sages danced juggled burning tourches, and huge oil-burning lamps that illuminated the entire city. The singing and dancing went on until daybreak, when a procession would make its way to the Shiloach Spring which flowed in a valley below the Temple to "draw water with joy." "One who did not see the joy of the water-drawing celebrations," declared the sages of the Talmud, "has not seen joy in his life."

While water was poured each day of the fetival, the special celebrations were held only on Chol Hamoed [] since many of the elements of the celebration (e.g., the playing of musical instruments) are fornidden on Yom Tov.

Today, we commemorate these joyous celebrations by holding Simchal Beit HaShoeivah ("joy of the water drawing") events in the streets, with music and dancing. The Lubavitcher Rebbe initiated the custom of holding such celebrations on Shabbat and Yom Tov as well -- without musical instruments of course. The fact that we cannot celebrate as we did in the Temple, said the Rebbe, means that we are free to celebrate the joy of Sukkot with singing and dancing every day of the festival.

Link: The Taste of Water []

• Links

Links: A Sukkot Anthology []; more Laws, Customs & Insights [] (from

Daily Study

Chitas and Rambam for today:

Chumash: Vezot Hab'rachah, 3rd Portion Devarim 33:13-33:17 with Rashi
• English Text:

Tehillim: Chapters 77 - 78
• Hebrew text:
• English text:

Tanya: Iggeret HaKodesh, middle of Epistle 22
• Lesson in Tanya:
• RealAudio:
• Windows Media:

• Sefer Hamitzvos:
• 1 Chapter: Mikvot Chap. 11
• 3 Chapters: Shabbat Chap. 27, 28, 29

Hayom Yom:
• English Text:


Are you prepared for Sukkot?

Our extensive Jewish New Year website has how-to’s, stories, lessons and even recipes! It's sure to make your holiday more meaningful and insightful!

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